Hannah Knight Libby (Carter)

Hannah Knight Libby is my great, great, great, great great grandmother. Here’s everything I have so far on her life. If you know of any other biographical, genealogical, or historical info about her, I’d LOVE to get it!

Mother Hannah Knight Libby Carter

(A Memorial prepared in 1941 by a group of her descendants)

Biography of

Hannah Knight Libby Carter

Hannah Knight Libby Carter was born October 9, 1786, at Scarborough on the coast of Maine. She was the daughter of Captain Zebulon Libby and Lydia Andrews. Her father, born about 1757, as a young man served three years in the Revolution and was afterwords a captain in the militia. He married Lydia Andrews, daughter of Deacon Amos and Ann (Seavey) Andrews on 19 of October, 1780. He died 6 December, 1836, and his widow on 9 December, 1838. They had 11 children, Hannah being the fourth child. Her brother, Amos, married, but his wife died a few years later. He then enlisted in the American army for one year and lost his life at the Battle of Plattsburgh in Canada, 26 October, 1831, during the war then being waged between Canada and the United States.

Practically all the ancestors of Hannah Knight Libby on both her father’s and mother’s lines have been traced back to the immigrant ancestor in America. The Libby genealogy was traced many years ago by a young man of 18 naturally inclined to genealogy who conceived the idea of tracing all his ancestors back to the immigrant to America. The first of the Libby family in Maine he found was John Libby who came from Sraodataire, near Canterbury, Kent, England. He, with others, settled at an early day in what later became known as Scarborough. There they suffered many attacks from the Indians, had many stirring adventures, and a number of their families were killed or carried into captivity.

Lydia Andrews, her mother, was a granddaughter of Hannah Knight, and for her she named her daughter, the subject of this sketch. Another maternal ancestor was May Ingersol who was also the progenitor of Laura (Ingersol) Sabord, the famous Canadian heroine of the War of 1812.

… On March 2, 1805, Hannah Knight Libby was married to John Carter. He was born in Scarborough, Maine, the son of Richard Carter and Jane McKenney the 17th of May, 1782. To them 11 children were born, the first three in Scarborough, and the rest in Newry, and as recorded by Phillip L. Carter, one of the children:

Dominicus born 21 June 1806

Almira born 3 January 1808

Hannah born 28 June 1809

William Furlsbury born 1 May 1811

Phillip Libby born 17 January 1813

John Harrison born 13 January 1815, died 11 April 1815

John Harrison born 6 October 1816

Eliza Ann born 28 September 1818

Richard born 8 August 1820

Mary Jane born 13 March 1823

Rufus born 9 October 1825

Nine of these children grew to maturity and had large families whose descendants now are numbered by thousands and may be found through the West and in practically all parts of the nation.

Hannah Carter was a refined, cultured woman. The family belonged to the Methodist Church. In 1834, Mormon elders brought to them in their home in Maine the gospel. The following account is written by Eliza Ann Carter Snow, daughter of Hannah.

I first embraced Mormonism in 1834 in the town of Newry, Oxford County, state of Maine. The first Mormon elders I ever heard preach were John F. Boynton and Daniel Bean. They came to my father’s house and my mother lay very sick. The doctors had given her up. The elders told her they were preaching a new doctrine and they told her that she could be healed if she could have faith, that they would hold hands on her. They did lay hands on her and said, “In the name of the Lord Jesus, be thou made whole.” And she was made whole and arose and called for her clothes and said, “I must go to the water. She walked one-half mile and was baptized in the river called Bear River and was confirmed. And there was a large branch raised up in that place.

John Carter did not join the Church. When his wife was healed he said, “That beats Doctor Bills,” but he never joined the Church.

Of the nine children, Dominicus, Hannah (who had married Aaron York), William F., John, Eliza Ann, and Richard were all baptized, most of them in 1834. Two daughters and one son never became members.

Responding to the spirit of gathering which rested upon them, those who had embraced Mormonism left Maine in 1836 and traveled all the way to Kirtland, Ohio, then to [the] headquarters of the Church. They attended the temple, took part in the wonderful meetings, and joined the Saints in singing the songs of Zion.

The next year an apostate movement arose and John F. Boynton, the missionary who had brought the gospel to them in Maine and had since became one of the First Quorum of Apostles, became one of the bitterest and most violent leaders against the Prophet. So intense was the persecution that those who remained staunch and faithful were forced to leave for Far West, Missouri.

Early in 1838 William F. Carter and Eliza Ann, who had recently married James C. Snow, set out together for Missouri driving an ox team. The graphic story of that trying journey is told by Eliza Ann.

It was cold weather and we suffered much with the cold, but we traveled until we came to Terre Haute, Indiana, and one of our oxen died, leaving us with one ox, so we were obliged to stop. We had no money, no house to go in, and we got the privilege of going into a horse stable and I cleaned it out and was glad to get into a place out of the storms. After stopping in Indiana a few weeks, Hyrum Smith’s company came along and he being acquainted with me, said to me, “If you will ride in my baggage wagon, I will take you along and you can drive the team and the men can walk.” I said I will do so.

We traveled until we came to Jacksonville, Illinois. There one of Hyrum’s horses died and he had to leave us. There was a branch of the Church nearby, but he did not leave us penniless among strangers, without home or friends, but he called for the president of the branch and told him to let Brother Snow preside over the branch as a missionary and to feed and cloth us until the Kirtland Camp company came along in the fall, and he did so. The president’s name was __errick, the brother that was killed at the Hann’s [Haun’s] Mill Massacre in Missouri. While we were there in the branch I looked out and, behold, there came my brother, William, with the one ox that we had left behind. He had made a harness and tackled him up, and the one ox carried his wife and three children to Missouri, and when I saw him I rejoiced to see him have so much faith, but the Gentiles made all manner of fun of him. “There goes a d___ Mormon with his ox.” But he got there just the same; and Father Joseph Smith said it should be in the annals of his history.

After that the Kirtland camp came along and we went to Missouri with them. We went into an old log house that we could poke a cat out between the logs and there my first child was born; it was the 30th day of October in the year 1838, Sarah Jane (her child), who became the wife of Marshall Kingman and afterward wife of President Joseph Young. It was cold and snowed every day and the mob came into Far West the very day of her birth, and we were much excited. I could not keep the midwife long enough to dress my child. Sister Diantha Billings was her name, well known among our people. The mob was blowing horns and firing guns all night long. We were without bread or anything to make bread of, but by the help of the Lord we were preserved by the brethren giving up their arms and promising to leave Far West. We left for Illinois in the month of February of the following year [1839]. There were three families to one wagon and one span of old horses, we took turns in walking. There was Brother Winslow Farr and wife, Garner Snow and wife, and James Snow and wife. We traveled all day and at night lay down at a campfire, as we had no tent.

In the famous Kirtland Camp which traveled from Kirtland to Far West were Dominicus Carter with six in his family, Aaron York with four in his family, and John Carter with two. Dominicus, on July 18, [1838], was appointed commissary of the camp. Once when three of the camp members were unjustly thrown into prison, Dominicus Carter voluntarily returned and stayed with them in prison until their release was obtained.

On August 11, [1838] in the fore part of the night, Sarah Emily, daughter of Dominicus Carter aged about two years and three months, died. Hers was the fourth death of the journey. Her funeral was held at two o’clock the next day.

But still further sorrows awaited him as the camp neared Far West. Every day they saw numerous men of the community take up arms and go to join the mob militia to drive the Mormons from the state of Missouri or exterminate them.

Someone suggested that a member of the camp turn back and not run into certain danger, but this proposal was unanimously rejected. The camp arrived at their destination July 4th, [1838]. Persecution and massacres were a frequent occurrence and mobs preyed upon the community.

During this time, Lydia, the wife of Dominicus Carter, was confined. When the baby was but five days old she was ordered by a mob with blackened faces to vacate her home by midnight, as they were going to burn it. She went into a nearby woods with her children and remained there through the night. There was a cold heavy rainfall, and as a result of this exposure so soon after the birth of her baby, she took cold and passed away shortly afterward, October 23, [1838]. Her surviving children were scattered among the relatives.

In February, 1839, the Saints were driven from Missouri. The leader of one group was Isaac Morley. He found a suitable spot for settlement near Lima, Illinois, where four walls of a log cabin had been set up. He moved it while it had neither roof, floor, or windows. Other families joined him, and soon a prosperous community had arisen, known as Morley’s Settlement. It was also called _____.

In the space of five years fertile farms had been developed and the community was a vertible hive of industry. On June 15, 1844, a mob of 2,000 men headed by bitter anti-Mormon Levi Williams, came upon the Saints at Morley’s Settlement and ordered them to make a choice of one of three alternatives. First they were to take up arms, join the mob and go with them to Nauvoo and help them to arrest the Prophet Joseph Smith and 17 other leaders. [Second], they must abandon their homes and go to Nauvoo, or third, give up their arms and remain neutral. They were given until eight o’clock to decide and told that if they did not join the mob they would “smell thunder.”

These brave and devoted Church members did not join the mob nor remain neutral, so they were compelled to leave their homes and flee to Nauvoo for safety. The Prophet heard their story and sent messengers to report this outrage to Governor Ford. Before any action was taken, however, the martyrdom of the Prophet and Hyrum occurred on the 27th [June, 1844], at Carthage Jail.

In the months that followed, the situation became more peaceful and the group returned to their homes in Morley’s Settlement, and peace reigned until September 10th, 1845, when another mob bent on destruction came upon the settlement and for eight days and nights fired upon the settlers, burned between 70 or 80 homes, all their stacks of grain, shops, and other buildings. The inhabitants were ordered out into the cold night during a drenching rain, and the aged, sick, and little ones suffered intensely, and many deaths occurred.

Edmund Durfee, one of the leaders of the community, was shot by the mob.

Brigham Young and the leaders advised them to abandon their homes and possessions to the mob, but to save as many of their families as they could and come to Nauvoo. Teams were sent from Nauvoo to assist in bringing them in.

In February, 1846, the exodus from Nauvoo began. Hannah Libby and her husband, John [Carter], had moved to Nauvoo as early as 1842 when they signed a deed in Hancock County purchasing land at Morley’s Settlement. She had received a patriarchal blessing from Isaac Morley in 1844.

At last the day of separation came. John Carter persistently refused to join the Church. Hannah, his wife, elected to come west with her people and her children who had embraced Mormonism. Before leaving Nauvoo, she was sealed for time and eternity to Isaac Morley.

They traveled westward with the body of the Saints as far as Council Bluffs. When the call for the Mormon Battalion came, Richard Carter, her youngest son, enrolled and was mustered into service July 16, 1846, at Council Bluffs. He served as a private in company “E” of the Mormon Battalion, commanded by Captain Higgins. On November 19, 1846, he died in service on the march to California, and was buried by his comrades at Puertelo, four miles south of Socow, New Mexico, on the Rio Grande, leaving a wife and two children. On April 12, 1852, at Council Bluffs, Iowa, his wife died of smallpox, and the children were brought across the plains by their aunt, Eliza Ann Carter Snow.

It is said that Dominicus Carter would have been one of first company of 1847 pioneers, but being an expert blacksmith, he was requested by the leaders to remain at Council Bluffs and help prepare the immigrant trains for the long journey.

He crossed the plains in 1851 accompanied by his aged mother, and they arrived in Salt Lake City 20 June, 1851. Shortly afterward he went to Provo, and in 1852 was selected as counselor to George A. Smith who was called to preside over the settlement. This position he occupied for years. The first president of Utah Stake was James C. Snow, son-in-law of Hannah Carter. In 1852, William F. Carter, another son, was appointed to a mission in India. He bore a letter of recommendation signed by the First Presidency, which read:

This certifies that the bearer, William F. Carter, is in full faith and fellowship with the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and by the very authorities of said Church, has been duly appointed a mission to Hindoostan to preach the gospel and administer in all the ordinances thereof pertaining to his office. And we invite all men to give heed to his teachings and counselings as a man of God sent to open to them the door of life and salvation; and assist him in his travels in whatsoever things he may have need. And we pray God, the Eternal Father, to bless Elder W. F. Carter and all who receive him and administer to his comfort, with the blessings of heaven and earth for time and all eternity. In the name of Jesus Christ, Amen.

BRIGHAM YOUNG

HEBER C. KIMBALL

WILLARD RICHARDS

He was also given the following letter of introduction.

To whom it may concern. Know ye that I, Brigham Young, governor of said territory in the United States of America, and I am personally acquainted with the bearer, William F. Carter, and know him be a respectable, high-minded, and honorable man.

And as Mr. Carter proposes visiting Asia on a mission, I cheerfully recommend him to the protection and the respect of all sovereigns, ministers of state, magistrates, and police authorities, and to the esteem of all honorable men among whom he may sojourn.

In token of which I have hereunto subscribed my name and caused the seal of said territory to be affixed at Great Salt Lake City, the first day of October, 1852, and of the independence of the United States of America the twenty-seventh by the governor.

BRIGHAM YOUNG

WILLARD RICHARDS,

Appointed by the Governor secretary protem.

During this mission he traveled completely around the world. He returned in 1853, visiting on his way back relatives in Maine and Illinois.

In June, 1852, Hannah Carter dictated the following message to her son, Dominicus, showing her deep interest in temple work for her kindred dead:

By request of your mother I am writing to you. She wishes to communicate to you some of her wishes with regard to her deceased relatives. She is well at present as common, but as life is uncertain, if it is not her privilege to live in this world to do the work for her parents and relatives that have gone the way of all the earth, she wants to leave this work so that it may be done and done right. She wishes to be ready to go when she is called. This is the way we all should leave.

Then followed a detailed list of relatives she remembered for whom temple work was to be done.

She remained at Provo during the time of the Echo Canyon War, and when the body of the saints moved south to Provo and adjoining towns. She lived in her later years at the home of Dominicus Carter. Those who remember her describe her as short in stature with a round face, impressive blue eyes, and refined and dignified bearing. She frequently wore a lace cap and was very prim and neat. She was well educated and always very industrious, keeping her knitting close by and working even in her advanced years.

Almost the last glimpse we have of her was obtained from a letter written on March 5, 1867, by her son, Dominicus, to his brother, Phillip Carter, living on the site of Morley’s Settlement in Illinois. Said he,

“Mother is still alive but very feeble. I don’t think she can live long. She is getting old– rising eighty. If you should want to see her before she should die you better come this spring and not wait till the railroad is finished. Mother wants me to say to you that she does not expect to live long on this earth and she wants that you should prepare to meet her in the world to come. She says the path she has pursued for the last 30 years is the only path by which you can enjoy her society in the world to come and be accepted of the Lord.

“Myself, John, Hannah, and Eliza Ann live in Provo City. William and Aaron live 25 miles from here at a place called Santaquin. Aaron did live in the Cotton County but has moved back. It was too hot a country for him. Aaron’s health is very poor, he is afflicted with rheumatism.

“I have quit smithing and gone to farming, my eyes are so weak. I have a large shop rented. Blacksmithing is a very good business here. Brother John works at the business about half the time.

“Now Phillip, the world is in a bad situation and they don’t know what the matter is. Therefore, I will honestly wish to give a little advise to my blood kin, whether kindly received or not to come out of Babylon or confusion and be with us from the trash of the nations. Yours respectfully, Dominicus Carter.”

Her death had occurred shortly before November 2, 1867, for on this day a letter written by Mary E. Whiting from Springville to a relative in Manti states “Mother Carter is dead.” Her funeral was held at the grave side in the Provo Cemetery. The day was very cold. Dominicus Carter spoke at the funeral of his mother and told how faithful she had always been. And he said she should come forth in the first resurrection.

The true spirit of her life mission is summarized in the inspired words of the Patriarch who pronounced upon her and her posterity this marvelous blessing:

“The heavens and the earth are stored with blessings for thee and thy posterity after thee. Thou hast been faithful in the day of trial. The principles of virtue are planted within thy bosom. The last day shall be thy best days. As the desires of thy heart shall be. Thy day shall be lengthened even until thou are an lawful heir and by proxy thou shalt adimmster and be blessed in thy administration in behalf of thine progenitors.”

By Patriarchal Blessing–May 5, 1844 Book 14.

On Memorial Day, May 30, 1941, 155 years after her birth, 90 years after she crossed the plains, and 74 years after her death 90 members of her posterity held a memorial service in her honor, sang again the songs that were sung at her funeral and listened to a sketch of her rich life story. Then once again they gathered at her grave side and dedicated a bronze marker as a Iasting memorial to her name and noble character. It bore this inscription beside the motif of a covered wagon.

HANNAH KNIGHT LIBBY CARTER

OCTOBER 9,1786 – NOVEMBER 1867

“FAITHFUL IN THE DAY OF TRIAL”


Hannah Knight Libby Carter Biography
Photocopy of typescript. Grammar has been standardized.

Almost the last glimpse we have of her was obtained from letter written on March 5, 1867, by her son, Dominicus, to his brother, Phillip Carter, living on the site of Morley’s Settlement in Illinois. Said he:

Mother is still alive, but very feeble. I don’t think she can live long. She is getting old, rising nightly. If you should want to see her before she should die, you better come this spring and not wait till the railroad is finished. Mother wants me to say to you that she does not expect to live long on this earth and she wants that you should prepare to meet her in the world to come. She says the path she has pursued for the last 30 years is the only path by which you can enjoy her society in the world to come and be accepted of the Lord.

Myself, John, Hannah, and Eliza Ann live in Provo City. William and Aaron live 25 miles from here at a place called Santaquin. Aaron did live in the cotton county but has moved back. It was too hot in the country for him. Aaron’s health is very poor, he is afflicted with rheumatism.

I have quit smithing and gone to farming. My eyes are so weak. I have a large shop rented. Blacksmithing is a very good business here. Brother John works at the business about half the time.

Now, Phillip, the world is in a bad situation and though I don’t know what the matter is, therefore, I will honestly wish to give a little advice to my blood kin, whether kindly received or not, to come out of Babylon or confusion and come with us from the crash of the nations.

Yours respectfully,

DOMINICUS CARTER

Her death had occurred shortly before November 2, 1867, for on this day a letter written by Mary E. Whiting from Springville to a relative in Manti states, “Mother Carter is dead.” Her funeral was held at the graveside in the Provo cemetery. The day was very cold.

Dominicus Carter spoke at the funeral of his mother and told how faithful she had always been. She had always been a true wife, had always held the priesthood, and he said she should come forth in the first resurrection.

The true spirit of her life mission is summarized by the inspired words of the patriarch who pronounced upon her and her posterity this marvelous blessing:

The heavens and earth are stored with blessings for thee and thy posterity after thee. Thou hast been faithful in the day of trial. The principles of virtue are planted within thy bosom. The last day shall be thy best days, as the desires of thy heart shall be. Thy day shall be lengthened even until thou are in lawful heir and by proxy thou shalt administer and be blessed in thy administration in behalf of thine progenitors.

By Patriarchal Blessing—May 5, 1844, Book 14

On Memorial Day, May 30, 1941. 155 years after her birth, 90 years after she crossed the plains, and 74 years after her death, 90 members of her posterity held a memorial service in her honor, sang again the songs that were sung at her funeral, and listened to a sketch of her rich life story. Then once again they gathered at her graveside and dedicated a bronze marker as a lasting memorial to her name and noble character. It bore this inscription (beside the motif of a covered wagon):

Hannah Knight Libby Carter

October 9, 1786-November, 1867.

“Faithful in the day of Trial.”

SOURCE(S):

  1. Carter Pioneers of Provo, Utah compiled by Arthur C. Coleman; pgs 137 – 145
  2. Writings of Early Latter-day Saints by Various authors
  3. http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~marlaprice/Histories/Hannahcarter.htm
  4. Hannah Knight Libby Carter, biography. Photocopy of Transcript
  5. http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~colby/colbyfam/b580.html

Lunch Bucket Canon: The Piece that Didn’t Make the Cut

Lunch Bucket Canon

In preparing The Ancestor CD, I had one piece that was intended to go on the album, but didn’t make the cut.  It needs some fixing up, and hopefully I’ll have it ready for publication later.  So it’s been sitting on my computer rotting for a couple months.  Then I realized that just because it’s not ready to sell doesn’t mean I can’t share it on my blog!  So here’s the piece that didn’t make the cut for my new CD.

Lunch Bucket is my daughter’s nickname, and I have a tradition of writing a lullaby for each of my kids.  After writing one for Lunch Bucket, I realized that the melody fits with the chord progression to Pachelbel’s Canon in D. So I made a little medley that is basically a variation on Canon in D, though it’s really Canon in C when I play it.

Oh, and I should tell you up front – this is NOT a solo.  It takes at least three people.  If I ever play this one in an up-close concert, I might even have everyone who can play Canon in C come up and jam along!

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When the Night Came: The Meaning Behind the Music

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When the Night Came

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Enos

1 Behold, it came to pass that I, Enos, knowing my father that he was a just man—for he taught me in his language, and also in the nurture and admonition of the Lord—and blessed be the name of my God for it—

2 And I will tell you of the wrestle which I had before God, before I received a remission of my sins.

3 Behold, I went to hunt beasts in the forests; and the words which I had often heard my father speak concerning eternal life, and the joy of the saints, sunk deep into my heart.

4 And my soul hungered; and I kneeled down before my Maker, and I cried unto him in mighty prayer and supplication for mine own soul; and all the day long did I cry unto him; yea, and when the night came I did still raise my voice high that it reached the heavens.

5 And there came a voice unto me, saying: Enos, thy sins are forgiven thee, and thou shalt be blessed.

6 And I, Enos, knew that God could not lie; wherefore, my guilt was swept away.

7 And I said: Lord, how is it done?

8 And he said unto me: Because of thy faith in Christ, whom thou hast never before heard nor seen. And many years pass away before he shall manifest himself in the flesh; wherefore, go to, thy faith hath made thee whole.

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His Rain

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His Rain

rainbow

His Rain
Vocals and Lyrics by Maria Hathaway Spencer
Music by Chas Hathaway

I am standing in the rain
In the sparkling drops of rain
I seek the warmth of new light
Beneath the endless sky

I am walking in the rain
In the sparkling drops of rain
Through the clouds I see a new light
A tunnel to the sky

The rain is clean
The rain is pure
I feel it wash away the world
I am new
I am pure
I found His light

I am dancing in the rain
In the sparkling drops of rain
I have found the warmth of His light
Descending from on high

His rain is clean
His rain is pure
I feel it wash away the world
I am new
I am pure
I found His light

I am new
I am pure
(I found his light)
I found His love

This post is originally from…

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His Rain

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His Rain

rainbow

His Rain
Vocals and Lyrics by Maria Hathaway
Music by Chas Hathaway

I am standing in the rain
In the sparkling drops of rain
I seek the warmth of new light
Beneath the endless sky

I am walking in the rain
In the sparkling drops of rain
Through the clouds I see a new light
A tunnel to the sky

The rain is clean
The rain is pure
I feel it wash away the world
I am new
I am pure
I found His light

I am dancing in the rain
In the sparkling drops of rain
I have found the warmth of His light
Descending from on high

His rain is clean
His rain is pure
I feel it wash away the world
I am new
I am pure
I found His light

I am new
I am pure
(I found his light)
I found His love

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From the North: The Meaning Behind the Music

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From the North

misty-water

D&C 110:11

After this vision closed, the heavens were again opened unto us; and Moses appeared before us, and committed unto us the keys of the gathering of Israel from the four parts of the earth, and the leading of the ten tribes from the land of the north.

I have always been fascinated by the history of the tribes of Israel.  They were in bondage, then led to freedom.  But their hearts weren’t right yet, so they couldn’t inherit the promised land.

Then when they did qualify, and were allowed to enter the promised land, they lasted a short time, and then fell back into wickedness.  So they were again taken into bondage.  Realizing their mistake, they repented, and the Lord showed mercy on them and led them away – both to the north and all over the world.

The history of the tribes of Israel is covered in blood, wickedness, repentance, forgiveness, freedom, pride, idolatry, and suffering.  It is a painful history, a sad history, and an inspiring history.

But we are living in the golden age of those tribes.  They are being gathered from around the world and brought into the church.

And sometime prior to the Lord’s return, He will lead the group that fled north back to the lands of their inheritance.  No longer will they teeter on the fence between righteousness and wickedness.

Their final redemption will be complete, and their scriptures, mingled with ours, will prove that the Lord is looking after ALL His people.

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Wide as Eternity: The Meaning Behind the Music

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Wide as Eternity

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Moses 7:23-41

23 And after that Zion was taken up into heaven, Enoch beheld, and lo, all the nations of the earth were before him;

24 And there came generation upon generation; and Enoch was high and lifted up, even in the bosom of the Father, and of the Son of Man; and behold, the power of Satan was upon all the face of the earth.

25 And he saw angels descending out of heaven; and he heard a loud voice saying: Continue reading

The Canyon Black: The Meaning Behind the Music

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The Canyon black

Vocals and Lyrics by Maria Hathaway

Music by Chas Hathaway

The Canyon Black is an abridgment of the poem, “The Valley of the Canyon Black,” by Maria Hathaway.  The poem is a parable of the Cain and Abel story.

The song is abridged, but the words to the original poem are written out in full here.

the-canyon-black

The Valley of the Canyon Black

by Maria Hathaway

Where the road follows the path of the stream

dividing the valley with one great seem

there cottonwoods in sunlight gleam

a morning wakes from twilight’s dream

in the Valley of the Canyon Black
Follow this road of dusty cloud

with rocks and boulders well endowed Continue reading

Heikhal: The Meaning Behind the Music

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Heikhal

heikhal

Heikhal is the Hebrew word for temple.  I have used a mode for this piece that is reflective of Middle Eastern music.

The temple is the most sacred place on earth.  There, the most sacred and divine ordinances are performed.  It is, quite literally, a bridge between heaven and earth.  Is it any wonder then that it is referred to as a place of revelation?  I suppose the veil is thinner there than anywhere else on earth.

Anciently, mountains acted as temples.  Sinai acted as the temple for Moses.  Then, when the Lord felt that the children of Israel were ready for more, He had them build the Tabernacle.

Once they reached the promised land, He had them build the Temple.  We often label it the temple of Solomon, but really it was the Temple of God.

Now temples cover the world.  But each is The House of God.  The power and influence of each building is not diluted by the increasing number of temples – rather, with every new temple, the power of God is increased in the world.  That power and influence increases exponentially with each new temple.

So how can we help that power increase?  Attend the temple.  Attend often, even regularly.  Whatever your circumstance, you can make more time for the temple.  As all of us attend the Temple more often, the need for more temples will increase, and the power of God will increase.

Even on a more personal level, as you attend the temple, you will see the power of God increase in your life.  You will be happier, and your life more fulfilling.  It’s that simple.  I promise.

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