Making Moments: Mickey’s Ogre

Today with Lunch Bucket’s help, I brought Mickey and some of the other stuffed animals to life.  I helped Mickey, and Lunch Bucket helped Bree (my stuffed animal horse).
Mickey and Bree built a castle for Mickey, but then a humungous ogre came and crushed it.
So to defend themselves against the ogre, they put up a fort – which he was able to climb over.
So they got together as a team and attacked him full-on.  They were able to knock him over, but the ogre was resilient, and got back up and tromped through their fort and castle rubble.
mickeys-ogre1 But then Raggedy Anne (with Jenni’s help) came and explained to the group that their ogre was actually a cute little nice boy.  So they befriended Tootles, the “ogre.”  And played hide-and-seek with him until bedtime.

Mama! Can I help you cook?!

help-you-cook

Lunch Bucket LOVES to help us cook.  Mostly she just climbs up on the chair and pretends to stir while eating whatever is in the mixing bowl.  She’ll also eat whatever is on the counter – especially if it’s powdery.  She’ll tank down on flour if we let her.

Tootles has no interest in helping.  He just wants to watch – which would be fine, if he didn’t INSIST on watching from above.  In other words, he has to be held in order to be happy while we’re cooking – preferably the one who is most busy at it.  He will take ocassional diversion however, if he can manage to get a drawer open.  Especially if there are knives, bags, or some other dangerous item inside.

I’ve tried stuffing the drawers with toys and stuffed animals, but he just pulls them out, plops them on the floor, and digs deeper until he can find a real treasure – such as the butcher knife.

Hi, I’m a Tennis Racquet!

hi-robyn

As soon as my brother Jake gets married, Lunch Bucket will have a new Aunt Robyn. She has really taken a liking to Robyn, and has decided to name one of our tennis racquets Robyn. She walks it around like a person, saying, “Hi, I’m Robyn.”

Don’t you just love the imagination of a child?

Making Moments: To the Park!

I love this time of year.  It’s getting lighter in the evenings, and the weather is significantly warmer.  Jenni and I took the kids to the park.  That was a lot of fun.  There were other kids on the playground, so I was a little shy to get up there with Lunch Bucket, but soon both found it fun to dig in the sand with me.
We built a couple of miniature castles with dragon caves and roads.  Very simple, but very fun.
Jenni had a great time with Tootles on the playground bridge.  He could hardly stand up unless he held the side bar, but he seemed to love it.

Why Mormons Build Temples

With the hype that the Church has gotten about temples lately, I would respond that the temple is a house of God, and I deeply love its ordinances.  They get me closer to my Savior Jesus Christ, and they help me become closer to my family.

I attended the temple this last weekend, and every time I go, I love the Lord more, I love my family more, and I want to try harder to be like my Savior.

Through the ordinances of the temple, I can have my family forever.

Here’s a video the Church put out about why we build temples.  I agree with it one hundred percent!

The Princess is Sleeping

You can probably imagine why these videos made me think of Toodles and Lunch Bucket. These guys know what play is really about. Play them full-screen if you want the full effect…





First Dance

First Dance

My first dance was in the fifth grade, but I made sure not to dance with anyone. Me and another guy came up with a strategy to avoid dancing on the girls-choice dances, since we never would have asked anyone ourselves! It quickly became clear that wall-flowers usually ended up dancing with someone at some point, so as soon as the music started, we would walk around the middle of the dance floor as if headed somewhere.


Sometimes I’d dance in place for a moment if a teacher was near. Teachers were good at setting people up to get them to dance with someone. When the snowball dance started, we made sure to go get a drink and use the bathroom, taking a considerable amount of time getting back. Using these methods, I was able to make it through the dance without ever having to dance with a girl.

When I turned twelve, one of my first church youth activities was a youth dance. Using my sneaky method, I was able to avoid dancing with a girl for a while – until Sister Johnson, one of the young-women leaders caught on to what I was doing. While strolling about in the middle of the dance floor, weaving in and out of dancing couples, I suddenly walked right into Sister Johnson (obviously she had aligned her position). With a big smile, she said, “Chas, have you danced with anyone yet?”

I knew I was doomed, and gave in, saying, “Uh… no… not really.”

Then she grabbed the first laurel to walk by and said, “Dawn, would you like to dance with Chas?”

Of course, being a mature 16 year-old, she took pity on this poor little deacon. “I’d love to!”

Feeling like a mouse caught in a trap, I stood there as she put her hands on my shoulders. I was shocked. What was I supposed to do now? I stood there stupidly.

“Put your hands on my waist,” she instructed. I couldn’t believe this was happening. I was supposed to actually dance with this girl! I’d seen the others dancing, so I guess I knew I was supposed to put my hands on her waist, but I couldn’t work up the courage to do it before the invitation came. I put my hands on her waist and we rocked back and forth slightly, turning gradually in circles. The song was already half over by the time we started dancing, but that second half of a song felt like the length of twenty songs.

When the song finally ended, she thanked me for the dance and I bolted. For the rest of the evening, I kept clear of that girl.

At home after the dance, mom told me how Dawn had come up to her and Dad after our dance and said, “Your son is so cute! I had to tell him to put his hands on my hips!”

Turning purple at the thought that Mom and Dad knew that I had danced with a girl, I wormed off to my room. Maybe next time I would slough the dance entirely.