The Sixth Day

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The Sixth Day

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The Sixth Day is the sixth piece in the Creation Series, and the sixth track on the CD, The Ancestor, by Chas Hathaway

See more entries about The Ancestor CD

My First Music Video! Yay!

I’ve finally completed my first music video.  I guess it’s a little more like a music slideshow, but the piano piece is from the CD I’m planning on releasing at the end of July (If all goes well – and so far so good!) and it’s called, The Fourth Day, referring to the fourth day of creation.  That also means that this is the first time the piece has been published anywhere.  What do you think?

Copyright ©2009 Chas Hathaway, Willowrise LLC

And in case that version doesn’t work (some people’s computers don’t play it right), here’s a link to it on Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/user/chashathaway

If that doesn’t work, you can also watch it at Exposureroom.com

By the way, the giveaway where you help me come up with the name of my piano piece is still active!  Just comment with a name suggestion for the piece.  If one of the names you suggest is the one I decide on, then you get a free copy of my Dayspring CD.  It really is as simple as that, so just comment on that post with as many name suggestions as you want.  You can’t lose!

The Isaiah Barrier: Tips for Surviving Second Nephi

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talltab1How many times have you read first Nephi?  If you are like me, you’ve probably read it at least twice as many times as you’ve read any other book in the Book of Mormon.  Thank heaven Nephi does such a great job in his first book.  But then what happens?
talltab1You’re reading along, having a wonderful spiritual experience.  You’ve finally gotten back into the habit of reading the Book of Mormon every day.  You’re so proud… er… uh, pleased with yourself.  Then all of a sudden you read a verse that says:

“…kings shall be thy nursing fathers, and their queens thy nursing mothers; they shall bow down to thee with their faces towards the earth, and lick up the dust of thy feet…”

talltab1“Uh, okay…” you think to yourself, “I’ll just file that away into the back of my brain and get back to the good stuff.”
talltab1So you continue reading.  It doesn’t take you long to figure out that the strange Hebrew poetic writing doesn’t go away.  It lasts till the end of the chapter, then continues on to the next, and the next, and the next.  Before you know it, you’ve lost your daily habit and you’re hating yourself for not being able to work through the Isaiah barrier.
Sound familiar?

talltab1Let’s explore some ideas for getting through the Isaiah barrier without too many permanent scars.

  1. Take it in stride. Don’t expect yourself to race through it at the pace you’ve been going.  It’s not traditional English prose.  It’s not even traditional Hebrew prose.  It’s okay if your scripture study is only a few verses instead of a whole chapter.  Better to read smaller chunks than no chunks
  2. justtallGet a commentary – I’m not talking about FARMS or Hugh Nibley.  They can sometimes be as daunting as Isaiah himself.  Just get the Church Publication: Religion 302, Old Testament Student Manual 1 Kings–Malachi.  That is the Church’s old testament institute manual for the second half of the old testament.  It’s very simple and clear, and believe it or not, it makes Isaiah easy to understand!  (I bet you thought that was impossible – au contraire!)  Give it a try.  By the way, it’s also available to read online for free: http://ldsces.org/inst_manuals/ot-in-2/manualindex.asp
  3. justtallPray. Pray hard.  You’ll need all the help you can get, and who can help you better than the real author!
  4. justtallRewrite it. Okay, so this is a little more involved, and may take some help from tip 2, but give it a try.  Re-write each verse in plain English.  It’s not interpreting and rewriting the scriptures for publication, it’s putting it in your own words to help you get a grip on what’s going on.  Plus it’s kind of fun.
  5. justtallGet out the maps.  Better yet, jump on the computer and goof around on Google Earth (did you know that’s a free download?  It’s much cooler than Google maps, too.  Trust me) and punch in locations as you come across them.  Isaiah’s a real geography buff, and mentions places a lot.  Sometimes seeing it visually can help a lot.
  6. justtallFind scriptural commentary on Isaiah.  Isaiah is such a popular topic in the scriptures (especially in the Book of Mormon), that a lot of the verses are mentioned by other prophets and expounded in detail.
  7. justtallIf all else fails, skip itOh my heck, did I really just say that?  Yeah.  It’s a last resort, but if it’s a choice between losing your scripture habit and skipping the chapters, just skip them.  If you get really good at your habit, you’ll come back in the future.  The Isaiah chapters are more or less done by the end of 2 Nephi 24, so just jump to 2 Nephi 25.

talltab1Well, that’s about all I know.  Any more ideas?  How do you work your way through Isaiah?  Any tips for the rest of us?

Oh, by the way, here’s a scripture for the day!

3 Nephi 23:1

And now, behold, I say unto you, that ye ought to search these things. Yea, a commandment I give unto you that ye search these things diligently; for great are the words of Isaiah

Humility, Joy, and Gladness

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In Humility, Joy, and Gladness

I was sitting in church last week, singing the hymn, “In Humility, Our Savior,” when I began to notice the chord progression on the song.  To myself, I quietly began to sing the Hymn, “On This Day of Joy and Gladness,” and to my surprise, they seemed to fit.

So later I decided to try putting them together, and this is what I came up with.  Interesting, how similar the two are!

– Chas

Click here to see more posts of my hymn arrangements

The Power of an Ordinary Day

Most days are ordinary days. Most often, when I come to the end of the day, I can’t think of anything that occurred during the day to distinguish this day from any other day in my life. It’s amazing how many times a day starts full of grand ideals and ideas, with motivation, determination, or anticipation, only to end up as an ordinary, useless day.

We all know how precious time is, yet it still passes. It passes as quickly and effortlessly as the clouds that come and go unnoticed.

Some would consider it a depressing idea that an individual could be born, live, and die in complete anonymity. But to me, it is fascinating, because that inconspicuous forgotten soul can still progress to immortal glory, worlds without end. When you see things from the perspective of eternity, the least of us has as much potential as the greatest of us.

So what about time? Can a seemingly meaningless day be worth the value of endless days? Can my pointless day hold as much meaning as what another might experience in a million years of life?

I believe it can. Perhaps today was the day I thought of the idea of getting a book from the library to identify a tree in my yard. Days later I act on that thought, and check out the book, which leads me to take greater interest. Perhaps my simple thought may lead me to one day become a professional botanist or herbologist. Perhaps today I thought of the idea of emailing an old friend – or a new friend, which eventually leads to a lifetime friendship.

Have you ever wondered when Leonardo Davinci got the first thought, the first idea, to try doing something with art. Was he a child? Was it on an ordinary day? Did he even act on the thought for a few days? I’d be surprised if the very first inclination to try something creative didn’t come on an ordinary, boring, and meaningless day.

Most people meet their future spouses on ordinary days. Most people’s first exposure to their genius came on days that seemed to Continue reading

Dayspring

Time is such an interesting phenomenon. It passes so quietly and consistently that sometimes we forget it’s passing. Some speculate that time is speeding up – or that our perception of time is changing, making time seem to pass faster, giving us less and less time. Have you ever thought about what it would mean if we could consciously alter our perception of time? What if we could freeze a moment, preventing the raindrop from ever reaching the ground? What if we could stand invisible and cause time to pass around us at a speed that made a year pass in a few moments?

What if a year could be condensed into one day? What if all four of our seasons were to cycle in a 24 hour period? I suppose morning would be springtime, day would be summer, afternoon would be autumn, and night would be winter. What would take place in the time of a single sunrise?

Our life passes in cycles. Each second there are atoms passing through us at unfathomable speeds, revolving like miniature galaxies – passing eons while we take a single breath. Perhaps if we were living on a planet the size of an atom, we would live out our lives and die before a millisecond of real time had passed.

Our minds process thousands of impulses in a moment, and our senses are constantly taking in fresh new information. Our hearts beat every second, minute after minute, hour after hour, day after day. Never does it stop, never does it rest. The sun rises each morning, and sets each night. So it has been since the beginning of the world.

If we expand outward, we find that while our tiny Earth spins carelessly through space, our Sun is also revolving, ever slower, around the center of the Milky-way galaxy. Now science is finding galaxies revolving around larger masses. I suppose one can never discover the end of such cycles, though they permeate our existence.

Now consider God, surrounded by the most glorious displays in eternity and the grandeur of the universe – But His attention is on His children, passing through this life in a few brief moments of His time. Each child was sent with reassurance and love. Each child was given all the knowledge they would need to return safely. As they left His presence, He asked them to remember, and return. But then, wandering the planet, each became preoccupied with his/her own interests and dreams, forgetting their Father almost entirely. They wallowed through darkness and death, as if in perpetual winter, without hope, without love, without light.

It pained Him to see us so oblivious to the fact that our life is valuable and short, yet it would defeat the purpose of our lives for Him to appear and take away all our problems. So instead, He sent a message. He sent His Son.

Through the tender mercy of our God; whereby the dayspring from on high hath visited us,

To give light to them that sit in darkness and in the shadow of death, to guide our feet into the way of peace.

Luke 1:78-79

Today is a new day. In the eyes of Eternity, your life will pass in a single moment. Savor it, enjoy it, and make the most out of every second – but don’t forget to look up occasionally and gaze into the eyes looking down on you.

Listen to Dayspring

To listen to more pieces or purchase my Dayspring CD, visit Willowrise.com