Date Ideas: Talking Dates (Conversational)

Sometimes a relationship could have great potential, but you don’t seem to do much talking. “We never talk!” some complain. It could be that your dates don’t involve activities that are very conducive to talking. Try some of these conversational dates, see if they help.

Go for a Drive

Nothing like being trapped together in a small for a while space to encourage conversation, and with a great view, too!

Watch the sunrise or sunset together

Swing by the store and get muffins and orange juice, then go watch the sunrise. Or stop at take out to eat while watching the sunset.

Climb a Tree

Climb a tree together and hang out there for an hour or two. Not only does it make for great conversation, but there’s usually a cool view up there.

Skip Rocks in a Lake or Pond

Find a lake or large body of water to skip rocks in. If you don’t know how, have your date teach you. See who can get the most skips.

Have a Picnic

Most cities have a park, and most country areas have hills or forests that make for great picnic areas. If you want it to last a little longer, pack the picnic ingredients instead of ready food so you’ll be making the food while together talking.

Take Your Date’s Dog(s) for a Walk

If you run out of things to talk about, hey, there’s always the dog.

Play, “Would You Rather?”

Think of two equally extreme situations, and take turns asking each other which they would rather do. It can be related to pain, ethics, fear, or discomfort. For example, “Would you rather die by freezing to death or burning in a fire?” or “Would you rather eat a ball of lint the size of a basketball, or eat a ball of horsehair the size of a baseball” or “Would you rather betray your mother to save a city, or passively allow the destruction of a city to be loyal to your mother?”

Play, “What’s Your Favorite Smarty?”

This is a game where you ask your date a question, and instruct them not to answer, but you try to guess how she would answer. Then she tells you if your right or gives you the correct answer. Every time you get a right answer, you get a point. Then switch. Have her ask you a question, but then guess the answer, and you tell her if she’s right. See who can get the most right answers.

Play, “What would you do if…”

This one’s kind of like “Would you rather,” but the idea is to find out what your date would do in a given situation. For example: “What would you do if there was an earthquake right now?” or, “What would you do if you saw tiny child driving a car?” or, “What would you do if an alien ship swooped down from the sky and put a spotlight on you?”

Compare your responses with his. See what you can learn about each others personalities from the differences and similarities in your reactions.

Study a Hot Topic Together

Get some newspapers, mobile devices, or computers, and study a hot topic together. What’s something big on everyone’s mind right now? See how each other feels about the issue, and see if you can find some things to give you a different perspective.

A Musical Language: Speaking through Music

Here’s a crazy idea – though it’s not exactly a whim, since I’ve had the idea floating around in my head for about eight years now. I’ve always been fascinated with the capacity music has to communicate feelings and convey messages in a way that is often more powerful and effective than written or verbal communication. What if we were to come up with a language that was spoken through music? A system that actually uses notes to communicate detailed information. It would have to be detailed enough that someone could translate the Bible into the language, and yet simple enough that it wouldn’t take years of training to get it. Not a code, exactly, but something between a code and a language.

In a sense, what I’d like to see is someone pipe a tune, and someone else understand the detailed message.

Some ideas have been explored along these lines. Probably the biggest is Solresol, invented by François Sudre in the 1800s, which is simply a language that uses words spelled with different combinations of notes in the basic piano scale. It has its own dictionary and grammar, too.

But I would like to see a language that is more than a code that uses notes for letters. Ultimately, the ending product has to be both beautiful music and a clear message. It has to be as artistic and aesthetically pleasing as it it literary.

While we’re at it, let’s go ahead and make its written form as beautiful artistically as its sound is musically. So in other words, Continue reading

A Musical Language: Speaking through Music

Here’s a crazy idea – though it’s not exactly a whim, since I’ve had the idea floating around in my head for about eight years now. I’ve always been fascinated with the capacity music has to communicate feelings and convey messages in a way that is often more powerful and effective than written or verbal communication. What if we were to come up with a language that was spoken through music? A system that actually uses notes to communicate detailed information. It would have to be detailed enough that someone could translate the Bible into the language, and yet simple enough that it wouldn’t take years of training to get it. Not a code, exactly, but something between a code and a language.

In a sense, what I’d like to see is someone pipe a tune, and someone else understand the detailed message.

Some ideas have been explored along these lines. Probably the biggest is Solresol, invented by François Sudre in the 1800s, which is simply a language that uses words spelled with different combinations of notes in the basic piano scale. It has its own dictionary and grammar, too.

But I would like to see a language that is more than a code that uses notes for letters. Ultimately, the ending product has to be both beautiful music and a clear message. It has to be as artistic and aesthetically pleasing as it it literary.

While we’re at it, let’s go ahead and make its written form as beautiful artistically as its sound is musically. So in other words, it would be a language that looks like art when it is written, and sounds like music when it is spoken. There would be little or no need for tongue and mouth articulation, as is present in every language I know except Sign.

Mind you, this would be a MAJOR undertaking. If it leaned more toward the side of code, then it would take very careful rules that would maintain beauty and simplicity while allowing a detailed message without taking too much time to convey it. If, on the other hand, it leaned toward the side of language, then it would need its own dictionary and grammar rules.

Just think how fun it would be to write a detailed message, and then put it to music by simply translating it into this musical language. If it was really well made and well planned, such a language could shape the future of composition in the future for thousands of people. It would completely obliterate the question of whether or not it is possible to convey a message using music alone. It would not only supply the usual feelings and subconscious patterns, but it would speak words with as much clarity and accuracy as this blog entry. And if a picture paints a thousand words, this would paint a hundred thousand words.

I have toyed with (as well as started on and off) to create this language/code, but time has limited me from really diving into it. But here are a few rules that I think would have to be kept constantly in mind for it to have any chance of being what I envision it:

  1. It has to sound beautiful – or at least any message spoken would have the potential for sounding like decent music, and in written form, looking like decent art.

  2. It would have to be fairly simple to learn. How many people do you know that can speak Klingon? Sorry, but complex language systems intimidate people, so this has to be fairly simple.

  3. It has to be able to carry as detailed a message as the composer (or speaker) needs to speak.

  4. It has to be able to convey the message in a time-frame comparable to living languages today. (IE it can’t take 5 minutes to say, “I went to the store and bought a burrito.)

  5. It has to be able to be spoken by a single individual without the aid of others. Harmony and chord structures may be used to emphasize, expand, or provide multiple levels to the message, but a basic communication has to be able to be spoken by one person by either voice or instrument.

  6. Just remember the most important things are that it’s spoken and written form is beautiful, and its message can be detailed.

  7. Other elements, such as rhythm or note-length can assist in speaking the language, but they probably ought to be used more in grammar rather than individual words in order to allow the composer or speaker as much creative liberty as possible to compose a piece of music using the language.

So there you have it. Any thoughts? Ideas? Criticisms? It’s a kind of wild idea, but we’re living in an age of wild ideas, and if we pull together, we can make some wild ideas awesome ones.

Popular Music Guidelines

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Popular Music Guidelines

Music, Art, and Media Series

Larry Bastian, “Popular Music Guidelines,” Ensign, Apr 1974, 37

Have you ever wondered why things like beat, rhythm, and intensity are mentioned by the brethren as things to be aware of when are choosing what type of music to listen to?  I have, and this talk addressed that very well.

This post is originally from…
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Phonecall with Lunch Bucket

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Lunch Bucket Phonecall

Jenni called me at work, and Lunch Bucket begged for the chance to talk to me.  After about five minutes, I realized it would be fun to record the rest of the call, so I did.  This is about half of the call.

Childrens Story: Mr. Johnson

I’ve mentioned my aspirations to write a Childrens book or two – well, here’s another go at it.  This one would portray a small child talking with a very old man named Mr. Johnson.  Thanks to Ezioman on flickr for the borrowed photo!

Old Man and Child

Mr. Johnson

“Mr. Johnson, I declare, haven’t you got any hair?”

“I’ve thought hard, my little scout, thought till all my hair fell out!”

“Why then are your eye’s so crinkly, why is your whole face all wrinkly?”

“Skin can slowly fold in half, each time I smile or start to laugh!”

“You don’t walk, you only hobble, when you try you start to wobble!”

“You can see all things are holy, when you try to walk more slowly.”

“Why then do your poor ears ring, so you can hardly hear a thing?”

“Greater voices that I hear, speak from the heart, not through the ear.”

“Even when you look at me, your eyes are much too dim to see.”

“The greatest things will always be, the things we do not hear or see!”

“Mr. Johnson, please reply, are you so old that you will die?”

“My child, my child, I think I might,
but everything will be alright.
Little one, come close and hear,
for death is not a thing to fear.
There came one once who made a way
so all will live again someday.
‘Follow me, and live’ He said,
and He Himself rose from the dead.
He taught us how to love and give,
he showed a better way to live.
And if we do the things we ought,
and live to follow as he taught,
then when our death comes beckoning,
our death will be a joyful thing!”

“Mr. Johnson, I don’t know, I will miss you if you go!”

“Yes, my child, I’ll miss you too, but I will still watch over you,
and when you come to join me then, we’ll be together once again!”

– Chas

Making Moments – Yucky Momma

Making Moments – Yucky Momma

Lunch Bucket woke up early this morning, and since she and I were the only ones up, we ate breakfast together.  She started talking about Tootles.
Now that Tootles is walking and a little more sturdy, he and Lunch Bucket are able to play together without too much problem – though we still have to watch her a bit.
“Is Tootles your best friend?”
“Yeah, he’s my best friend.”
“That’s good.  It’s fun to be friends with your family, huh?”
“Yeah.”
“That’s neat.  Did you know Momma is my best friend?”
“Yeah.  But Momma’s not yummy.  Momma’s Yucky.”
She labels anything that you can’t eat as yucky, and anything you can eat as yummy.
Thinking she wouldn’t notice or understand, I mumbled, “Actually, Momma’s quite yummy…” and then louder, “but we don’t eat her, do we?”
“Momma’s not yummy!  Momma’s yucky!”
“We don’t eat Momma, huh?”
Now she was starting to get her, ‘I’m going to start crying if you don’t agree with me’ voice.
“Momma’s not yummy!”
I sighed, “Okay, okay, Momma’s yucky.”
After that she calmed right down and continued eating her cereal.